Be professional through the worst anxiety

Standard

Having anxiety can make one unreliable. Just ask all my friends about what I was like before admitting I had an anxiety disorder–I often canceled plans because I was “sick”, ignored their calls and took days to respond to texts (okay, admittedly I still do that last one).

This can be quite a problem when doing creative work for clients. Too anxious to work? You’re going to be missing deadlines.

I’ve been on both sides of this, the overly anxious writer and in impatient editor waiting for a story. You want to get your work in, but you can’t breath. You want to be easy on the anxious writer, but you have your own deadlines to meet.

Here are a few tips for helping avoid looking like an unreliable fool.

Pad deadlines

Sometimes I know I’ll be able to get a job done in a matter of days, but I tell the client it’ll be ready in a few weeks to months. Maybe I finish it in a few days and they get it early and I look like some badass who prioritized their work to get it to them ahead of schedule. Maybe a rush job comes up and I put it on the back burner to finish (still on deadline) later. And maybe I have a total meltdown and need to step away from work for a few days to take care of me. With a padded deadline, I don’t need to feel guilty about putting my health first.

Schedule time to respond to emails, and do it

I often get overwhelmed by the number of texts, phone calls, emails and other messages I need to respond to. And so I put it off and put it off and put it off, and then look super flaky to clients who are waiting on a response.

As a fix to this, I let folks know that I only check my emails a few times a week and don’t respond to any Facebook or other social media messages related to work. If I’m feeling good, I might stay on top of messages everywhere (including giving gentle reminders that email is how I communicate). When I’m not doing so well, I don’t even look at messages until the hour or so I’ve scheduled for this. Then I force myself to go through them all.

It’s tough, but satisfying. Walking away, I’m often stressed that I’ll get flooded with responses and then people will get upset that I’m slow to respond to them. To make myself feel better, I add a little note to my signature saying I’ll be offline for a bit, so not to worry if I don’t get back again for a few days.

Be honest about what’s up

Your client is going to know you’re not an unreliable fool if you just fess up. “Hey, I know this was due today but despite padding my deadline I haven’t had time to finish because I’m being crushed by anxiety.” Then offer solutions, such as someone who could do a rush job for the same price or by giving a realistic new deadline. Just make sure this Plan B is guaranteed to get them the work on time. I know this can be scary, but the only reactions I’ve ever received from doing this have been:

  • Thanks for letting me know. That sucks.
  • Oh, wow. I’ve been there. Don’t even worry about it.

Losing work because of health struggles sucks and isn’t always unavoidable. I get it. That’s a huge part of why I’m working more for myself than for clients these days. One of my personal projects is Motivations for the Anxious Creative, my weekly newsletter for artists and writers who struggle with their mental health. Sign-up today and we can have some productive one-on-one convos about getting shit done.

Getting dressed

Standard

At the beginning of the school year I felt a lot of pressure to dress “professionally.” I’m not sure where that came from, but I went out and bought dress pants that were jean-like I thought I might be comfortable in and button-down blouses. This was my idea of what was professional.

Turns out that’s just not me. I felt so uncomfortable and so not myself. I got compliments that I looked nice, but I didn’t feel good.

This was a big lesson for me. Being comfortable in what I’m wearing is more important for me than how I look, but looking presentable is important.

I’ve realized that I can dress professionally without wearing things I’m not comfortable with. Even with a small budget.

I hit up Wolseley Wardrobe recently and bought some nice cardigans, knit sweaters and dark jeans that are totally work appropriate and make me feel really comfortable. While I was there I dropped off the “professional” clothes I bought in the summer. Good riddance!